Posts tagged: iPhone

A bigger iPhone? More probable than most might think

Sources in China seem to think that Apple will release a bigger iPhone that will have a 4.8 inch screen. I don’t know if these rumors are true, but they have a higher degree of probability since there’s a logical reason for Apple to go for a 4.8 inch screen size. So it’s either someone pushing bullshit rumors that accidentally got it right in terms of size, or there’s indeed some truth from these rumors.

I personally think that Apple could do a larger iPhone, if they think that they need to — their previous hardware decisions indicate that they are well aware when they need to release a significantly different (from a hardware point of view) device to capture the market: Apple didn’t stay with only the original iPod “classic” form-factor — they made the mini, nano and the shuffle, nor did Apple stay with the original 9.7 inch iPad — they released the iPad mini. Considering this, why should the iPhone be any different?
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The 4 inch iPhone 5

It seems that The Verge Forums became a platform for techblog readers, that can think and have something more to say, that just troll the comment section. A recent post by modilwar is a good example of that. In a nutshell, modilwar speculates about how Apple can increase the size of the iPhone’s display, while getting the maximum effect from it (i.e. increasing the display resolution) and avoiding the issues with fragmentation and existing applications. His solution? Change the aspect ratio, so that the display becomes more vertically elongated.

Modilwar also proposes two solutions to fight fragmentation issues, which would arise from moving to a different resolution: applications that use standard iOS user interface elements can just scale up to use addition screen real estate to display more content, while applications with custom a UI (e.g. games) can run at their native resolution of 960 x 640 pixels with black bars occupying the unused space.
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The Schmidt Bullshit

It certainly isn’t news that corporate people often lie or bend the truth their way, but it still strikes me how people put up with high-caliber bullshit from them. A recent example of this is Eric Schmidt, Google’s executive Chairman (and former CEO), answering a question about Android being a “stolen product” at a press conference in South Korea:

I would also point out that the Android efforts started before the iPhone efforts. And that’s all I have to say.

While Google did purchase Android (a project stared in 2003 by Andy Rubin, Apple’s former engineer) back in 2005, two years before Apple’s announcement of the original iPhone, back then it was nothing like the iPhone (and nobody then claimed that it was a stolen product) — it was developed for a blackberry-styled non-touchscreen smartphones with hardware keyboards, hence the early hardware prototypes.

Smartphones, that Android was initially developed for

Smartphones, that Android was initially developed for

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Siri’s iPhone 4S exclusivity

The talk about Siri’s iPhone 4S exclusivity being nothing more that marketing started right after the announcement of Apple’s new flagship smartphone. And while this is a very “convenient” explanation for various random tech blogs, in reality important products decisions are rarely made with such simple reasoning, especially at Apple or any other company, that is focused on quality of their products and the user-experience that they create.
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The problem with a card-based UI

If you’ll read reviews of the the recent HP/Palm smartphones, RIM’s BlackBerry PlayBook or the HP TouchPad, it’s very likely that you will find praise for their “card-based” user interfaces, as one of the best features of those products. The card-based UI has been widely referred as one of the most convenient ways to use a touch-screen device and the best way to switch between multiple applications running on the device. With all of this I still think that a card-based UI has serious problems, that are rarely covered, if covered at all.
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No market for small smartphones?

Every once in a while some tech blogger or journalist argues that their is no market for small smartphones, mostly when another small smartphone is about to hit the market (like the recent Veer 4G from HP), but is this the real case? Well, it certainly may look like this from the start since the majority of top-class smartphones on the market are rather big, but the truth is: a) that this is not really a valid point; b) it isn’t absolutely true.
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Thoughts on tech